Hallux Valgus Treatments

Overview
Bunions Callous
The best thing to say about the natural history of bunions is that they are unpredictable. This is both in terms of whether the bunion deformity will progress, and also whether the bunion will become painful (if it is not already painful). It would probably however be true to say that once a previously painfree bunion has started to become painful it is not common for the bunion to go back to being entirely pain-free.

Causes
Perhaps the most frequent cause of bunion development is the wearing of shoes with tight, pointed toes, or with high heels that shift all of your body’s weight onto your toes and also jam your toes into your shoes’ toe boxes. It’s estimated that more than 50 percent of women have bunions caused by high-heel shoes, and that nine out of 10 people who develop bunions are women. Bunions can also develop on your little toes, in which case they are called bunionettes or tailor’s bunions.
SymptomsThe main sign of a bunion is the big toe pointing towards the other toes on the same foot, which may force the foot bone attached to it (the first metatarsal) to stick outwards. Other symptoms may include a swollen, bony bump on the outside edge of your foot, pain and swelling over your big toe joint that’s made worse by pressure from wearing shoes, hard, callused and red skin caused by your big toe and second toe overlapping, sore skin over the top of the bunion, changes to the shape of your foot, making it difficult to find shoes that fit. These symptoms can sometimes get worse if the bunion is left untreated, so it’s best to see a GP. They’ll ask you about your symptoms and examine your foot. In some cases, an X-ray may be recommended to assess the severity of your bunion. Anyone can develop a bunion, but they’re more common in women than men. This may be because of the style of footwear that women wear.

Diagnosis
Your doctor can identify a bunion by examining your foot. Watching your big toe as you move it up and down will help your doctor determine if your range of motion is limited. Your doctor will also look for redness or swelling. After the physical exam, an X-ray of your foot can help your doctor identify the cause of the bunion and rate its severity.

Non Surgical Treatment
Podiatrists will treat bunions conservatively, using paddings and orthotics, which are devices that are made to protect the joint or deviate pressure away from it. Sometimes bunions will develop overlying callus or corns. These can be removed by a podiatrist, but if the area is irritated again by wearing ill-fitting footwear, the corn will grow back. Most people with this condition have flat feet, so arch supports are often recommended.
Bunions

Surgical Treatment
The decision to have bunion surgery is personal and different everyone. While there are many reasons to have bunion surgery, the most common reasons include. Pain. Difficulty walking. Difficulty fitting shoes. Worsening bunion. Pain at the ball of the foot. Failed conservative measures. See Non-surgical Treatment. Some people have surgery simply because they don?t like the way the bunion looks. While some doctors may correct your bunion if it doesn?t hurt, you should be aware that permanent pain may occur after your surgery.

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